Kananaskis Backcountry Bingo – Part 1

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Living in Calgary, I am extremely fortunate to have so many backcountry campgrounds whose trailheads sit within a 2-hour drive of my house. Banff National Park alone has more than 50, the near-by Yoho and Kootenay National Parks have another dozen. However, it is the 14 sites in Kananaskis Country which occupy a special place in my heart. This is where I first went backpacking as a 13 year old Scout and for the past 8 years, I’ve spent at least one night in of these campgrounds each year.

This summer I managed to finish one of my backpacking bucket list items, something I called “Kananaskis Backcountry Bingo”. A few years back, I set a goal of spending at least one night in each and every formal backcountry campground in Kananaskis. To celebrate, I thought I’d share my perspectives on each of them. For each site I give you my “out of 10” rating and the difficulty level of reaching the campground.

These sites are operated and maintained by Alberta Parks and as such, camping at any of them requires a permit. Permits can be purchased at https://reserve.albertaparks.ca/. As of this writing, permits are $12 per adult, per night plus a $12 reservation fee. Sites can be booked 90-days in advance and many of them are popular in the summer.

Peter Lougheed Provincial Park

Peter Lougheed Provincial Park is the proverbial crown jewel of Kananaskis. Nestled along the Great Divide, it’s mountain lakes, towering peaks, and well developed infrastructure, makes it a popular destination for campers, kayakers, mountain bikers and hikers. 90min west of Calgary, just off Alberta Highway 40, the park is accessible year-round. 

Point

Point Campground

The campground at Point has a special meaning for me, it’s not only the first backcountry campground I ever slept in, but also the first place I took my wife and both of my kids for their first night in the backcountry. A popular campground, there are 20 sites, situated on a peninsula jutting into Upper Kananaskis Lake. It can be reached by an easy 4km (2.5mile) hike or canoe from the Interlakes Trailhead at the end of Kananaskis Lakes Trail (which is the trailhead for most backcountry campgrounds in Peter Lougheed Provincial Park). The sites are private, with each one close to the shore of the lake (which is also the water source). Firepits, firewood, outhouses and food storage lockers are provided. I recommend Point as a great destination to introduce someone to the world of backpacking. Views of nearby Mount Lyautey and the lake make for nice backdrops and kids can spend hours skipping rocks on the lake.  Normally open year-round, Point is currently undergoing a full reconstruction and should be open for the summer of 2021.    7/10 (Easy)

 

Forks

Forks

Heading a bit deeper into the Upper Kananaskis Valley, Forks sits at a junction for the trails that lead to the South Kananaskis and North Kananaskis Passes (hence the name Forks). There are 15 sites located on a small rise above the Upper Kananaskis River (which is the water source). Access is via a 7km (4.5 mile) hike with 75m of elevation gain from the same Interlakes Trailhead that leads to Point. Much of the trail is through forest, so with the exception of some early views of Upper Kananaskis Lake, don’t expect much in the way of grand vistas. Firepits (but no firewood as of this writing), outhouses, picnic tables and food storage lockers are provided. It’s a good place for a simple in and out overnight trip, or if you’re travelling with younger kids. Not so much a destination itself, many folks use Forks as a basecamp for day hikes into the nearby upper valleys.     6/10 (Easy)

 

 

Three Isle Lake

Three Isle Lake

This was the destination for my first backpacking trip, and I still remember tiredly climbing the headwall to the lake. Three Isle Lake is an alpine lake surrounded by the mountains of the Continental Divide. Located 4km west from Forks, the trail steadily climbs past a waterfall and up a steep headwall with great views of the valley below. 11km from the Interlakes Trailhead with 475m elevation gain the trail does have some steep sections, but it is well worth it. A bit more challenging most folks can hike to the lake in a day. There are 16 sites split between two campgrounds, one at Three Isle Lake and the second at Three Isle Creek (both also acting as water sources). Outhouses, picnic tables and food storage is provided, but being a remote alpine valley, fires are not allowed. I

recommend planning to stay a few days in the area as there are several easy scrambles up to nearby peaks, and day hikes over South Kananaskis Pass into British Columbia and Beatty Lake. A good destination for someone looking for a destination to stay and explore.  8/10 (Moderate)

Turbine Canyon

Turbine

On my list of destinations for years, I finally made it up to Turbine this summer and I was not disappointed. Heading north from Forks, the 8km trail first takes you up the steep side of the Upper Kananaskis valley, offering expansive views. Once you gain the alpine, you’ll pass spectacular glacier tarns, meadows full of wildflowers and Lawson Lake. At the campground you can explore the nearby Turbine Canyon, where the creek disappears down a 2-foot wide crack in the rock. 15km from the Interlakes Trailhead with 525m elevation gain, the trail isn’t as steep as the one to Three Isle Lake. Fit hikers can make it to Turbine Canyon in a single day, while others will spend a night at Forks before. There are 12 sites along the bank of Maude Brook (which is the water source) with outhouses, picnic tables and food storage. As with Three Isle Lake, fires are not permitted. Another place to spend a couple of days, there are hikes to Maude Lake and North Kananaskis Pass, as well as Haig Glacier. I’ll definitely be back.  9/10 (Moderate)

 

 

 

Aster Lake

Aster Lake

My absolute favorite campground in all of Kananaskis, it’s also the most challenging one to reach. Established for mountaineers ascending the nearby Mount Joffre and Warrior Mountain, the unmaintained trail takes you through dense forests, up two steep headwalls (with some exposure), and a few sections of easy scrambling. Our trip to Aster Lake in 2013 and the challenges we faced is ultimately what inspired this blog. A small but highly popular campground in the high alpine, it boasts one of the nicest views from an outhouse you’ll ever see. 11km from the Upper Kananaskis Lakes Trailhead with 550m of elevation gain, navigation and routefinding skills are recommended. 5 spots are located next to Aster Creek (the water source) which book up quickly in the summer. Outhouses and food storage is provided, however there are no picnic tables, and fires are prohibited. Aster Lake is often the first night of the Northover Ridge loop which by some accounts is the most spectacular ridge walk in North America. For those unwilling to straddle the vertigo inducing Continental Divide, there are many options to explore the alpine in this high valley.    10/10 (Difficult)

 

Elbow Lake

While still technically within Peter Lougheed Provincial Park, Elbow Pass and the lake beyond is an important access point into Elbow Sheep Wildland Provincial Park and its trails and campgrounds. The birthplace of the Big Elbow River, Elbow Lake is nestled between Mount Rae and Elpoca Mountain. Don’t be surprised if you see backcountry skiers packing in their gear to get some turns in on Rae

Glacier year-round. An easy trail, the campground is only 1.5km (with 75m elevation gain) from the Elbow Pass Trailhead on Alberta Highway 40. 15 spots are located right on the lake (which is the water source) with outhouses, picnic tables, and food storage lockers. Firepits are provided, but as of this writing, no there is no firewood. This is a great destination for young kids, or someone looking for a quick Friday night getaway.  7/10 (very easy)

Elbow Sheep Wildland Provincial Park

Elbow Sheep Wildland Provincial Park extends from the end of Alberta Highway 66 on the east to Peter Lougheed Provincial Park on the west and covers the front ranges of the Elbow/ Sheep watershed. As a wildland provincial park, several activities are permitted which are normally restricted in regular provincial parks. For example, random camping (camping outside of campgrounds) is allowed in many areas, and depending on the wildlife management unit, you may encounter hunters at certain times of the year.

Mt Romulus

Mount Romulus

I remember reading about the 2-3 night Elbow Loop as a young Scout in Gillian Dafern’s Kananaskis Country Trail Guide, finally having the opportunity to complete it in 2018 it made for a nice September long weekend. If hiking counter-clockwise, the campground at Mt Romulus is normally your first night, an easy 12 km from the Little Elbow Trailhead at the end of Alberta Highway 66 (175m of elevation gain), the trail is multi-use so don’t be surprised to see mountain bikers or equestrians out for the day. If hiking clockwise, this campground would normally your 2nd or 3rd night, being 31km from the same trailhead, with 650m of elevation gain. There are 2 campgrounds at Mount Romulus, the first is a 10 site backpackers campground, with the second being a 10 site equestrian campground. Both have outhouses, picnic tables, food storage lockers, hitching rails, firepits and firewood. While normally visited as part of the Elbow Loop, there are many day hikes that lead up the Little Elbow Valley and it is possible to connect to the Evan Thomas valley and the Kananaskis Village beyond. A great loop to introduce someone to multi-night backpacking don’t be surprised to encounter hunters using this campground a basecamp in the fall.  7/10 (Easy)  

 

Tombstone

Tombstone Campground

The campground at Tombstone sits at the metaphoric heart of Elbow Sheep Wildland Provincial Park with access from several directions. From the west, the trail from Elbow Pass is 7.5km with 125m of elevation gain. From the north, the trail from Little Elbow Trailhead (via Mount Romulus) is 21km with 400m of elevation gain. From the east, the trail from Little Elbow Trailhead (via Big Elbow) is 22km with 650m of elevation gain. From the south, the Sheep River trail starting at Bluerock Campground at the end of Alberta Highway 546 is 21.5km with 450m of elevation gain. This last route is unmaintained and has a few unbridged creek crossings. Like Mount Romulus, there are two campgrounds at Tombstone, an 11 site campground for hikers and 4 for equestrians. Outhouses, food storage, picnic tables, firepits, firewood and hitching posts are provided. Typically the second night for those hiking the Elbow Loop, there are a multitude of day hikes in the area as well, including the beautiful Tombstone Lakes. The campground was reconstructed in 2019. 7/10 (Easy)

Big Elbow

Big Elbow Campground

A smaller campground on the Big Elbow River it is often used as the first night on the Big Elbow Loop if hitting the trail on a Friday afternoon. It is only 8km from the Little Elbow Trailhead at the end of Alberta Highway 66, with 125m of elevation gain. The trail is through forest for most of the way with some views of Threepoint Mountain and Banded Peak as you approach the campgro

und. While we originally planned to stay here when completing the Big Elbow loop in 2018, we got to the campground by lunchtime and ended up pushing on to Tombstone. I headed back for a short weekend trip in 2019 with my son, so I could check it off. There aren’t a lot of day hikes in the area, with an easy scramble to the top of Threepoint Mountain being the main opportunity. For those trying random backcountry camping for the first time, camping near Big Elbow is a good option. You must be 1km from the campground, but there are many flat places to set up and an outhouse is never far away, if you’re not quite ready to try taking a number 2 in the woods. 5/10 (Easy)

 

Keep an eye out for part 2 when I’ll talk about the campgrounds in Spray Valley Provincial Park and Bow Valley Wildland Provincial Park

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Kelly McDonald

After spending 12 years in Ottawa Kelly returned to Calgary in 2012 and decided to pick off where he left off by roping his closest friends into some new back-country adventures (some more fun than others).

Kelly McDonald is a father of two hobbits ages 12 and 13 and tries to get them out into the wilderness as often as he can.

1 Comment

  1. Andre McDonald

    Great write up Kelly…..

    Reply

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